Instructor Q&A: Jennifer Ziegler

“Writing is, above all, a matter of faith – in yourself, your story, and your characters. If you trust that things will fall into place, they almost always will.”

-Jennifer Ziegler

Jennifer Ziegler is the author of over 25 books, including everything from stand-alone novels to series work to TV tie-ins, and ranging in genre from quirky comedy to action-adventure to dystopian. Her books have been featured on the Lone Star List and International Reading Association’s Young Adults Choice list, recommended on NPR’s “Tell Me More,” optioned for film, and adapted into stage musicals. She also had the honor of serving as The Writers’ League of Texas’s Program Director until March of this year. Ziegler lives with her husband, author Chris Barton, in Austin, where she continues to write books, lead writing workshops, and give presentations at schools, conferences, and book festivals.

Jennifer is teaching a class for the Writers’ League of Texas called “Developing Characters: Make Readers Root for Your Protagonist” on Saturday, October 8 at the ACC Highland Campus. This class will help writers understand the role characters play in storytelling and give tips on how to find and develop them — and thereby, the plot. Read the interview below and visit the class page to learn more.

jzieglersmaller-1Scribe: What does it mean to craft believable characters? Can a great story be purely plot-driven?

Jennifer Ziegler: It depends on how you define “great story.” There are classic and entertaining stories out there with very thin or largely symbolic characters. For example, many myths and legends, some cartoons and comic books, ghost stories told around the campfire, plots of many slasher films, etc. But I do think a novel has to have a complex and relatable character (or more than one) at its center.

Plots of novels tie directly into character. There is a being of some sort who wants something–or is in a dilemma. How this being proceeds to solve this problem or attain this goal is the plot. For the story to be truly effective and relatable, we have to have a clear sense of who the characters are and why this struggle is so important to them. Then, as the story unfolds and they experience failures and triumphs, they change– at least a little. Thus, the plot is two-fold: the surface action and the character’s personal growth. Two arcs that are tied together.

Scribe: In your own writing, can you give us an example of a time during the writing process that you struggled to make a character realistic? What did it take to bring that character to life?

JZ: In my middle grade series, I didn’t know my main characters when I first started–I only knew that they were triplet sisters. However, it was vital that they be three distinct individuals and not just one character times three. For a long time, I struggled with the characterization, and then one evening I was at a party and introduced myself to friends of a friend. As we chatted, I discovered that they had twin girls. They told me about how they were similar, but also different. One detail in particular stood out: that their favorite game to play was Presidential Trivia. That, to me, said so much. I went on to borrow that nugget of information and apply it to my triplets. I figured out that they were also history buffs and very civic minded. The oldest (by a few minutes) planned to someday be President of the United States and was very take-charge in her personality. The middle triplet hoped to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and was the quietest and most thoughtful of the three. Meanwhile, the youngest triplet wanted to be Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and was the most social and active sister. Sometimes one detail–one frame of reference–can make all the difference in the world.

Scribe: You mention in your class description that characters can “rebel against you.” What advice do you have for writers in these situations—should writers try to wrangle characters that rebel?

JZ: Most of the time, the characters know best and wrangling them will backfire. They are the ones going through whatever hell you are putting them through. They will react/act according to who they are. If you try to make them do otherwise, the story will fall flat.  Sometimes the answer is to follow their lead. Other times you can compromise. It’s a process of letting something go. Must you have this plot point happen? Must this character be the one to make it happen? Are there alternatives that make sense according to what already exists on the page?

Scribe: In situations where a writer feels inspired to write about a character but has no clear plot, what are some problem-solving techniques they can use to uncover that character’s journey?

JZ: That’s something I’ll really delve into during the class. Basically, it depends on what the author knows about the character. Who is this being? Where does he/she come from? What are his/her goals, fears, quirks? If characters come to you, spend time with them. Get to know them. Listen. After a while, they will tell you their stories.

Writing is, above all, a matter of faith – in yourself, your story, and your characters. If you trust that things will fall into place, they almost always will.

Thanks, Jennifer!

Click here to register for Jennifer’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

 

Meet the Members: Jacob Grovey

“If I could’ve had the chance to speak with Dr. Maya Angelou, I would’ve asked her, ‘How were you able to be so inspiring in spite of the world around you?'”

-Jacob Grovey

Jacob Grovey joined Writers’ League of Texas earlier this month and lives in Austin, TX.

jgScribe: In what genre(s) do you write?

I write fiction and poetry.

Scribe: What author would you most like to have a drink with, and what’s the first question you would ask them?

Jacob Grovey: I have to give two answers for this. If I could’ve had the chance to speak with Dr. Maya Angelou, I would’ve asked her, “How were you able to be so inspiring in spite of the world around you?” Secondly, I would like to converse with Chuck Palahniuk. I think I would have to ask him, “How in the world are you able to come up with this crazy stuff?”

Scribe: If you were stranded on a deserted island, what book would you want to have with you to keep you sane?

JG: I know this may sound cliché, but I would have to take the Bible. Even though I am still working on being able to read it more, no author’s words can even begin to compare to God’s.

Scribe: What have you learned from your association with the Writers’ League?

JG: Even though I haven’t been a member for long, I am already starting to see how many opportunities are available for me. Even this interview wouldn’t be possible without being a member of the Writers’ League.

Scribe: Where do you see your writing taking you (or you taking it) in the future?

JG: In the future, my writing will allow me to see even more of the world. With my writing, I will eventually be able to continuously donate money and help build communities (globally).

Scribe: Here at the Writers’ League, we love sharing book recommendations. What’s one Texas-related book that has come out within the past year that you couldn’t put down?

JG: One book I haven’t been able to put down recently is the biography, Unashamed. It was written by Texas’s Grammy-award winning rapper, LeCrae. Even if you’re not into rap/spoken word, I would recommend reading about his testimony and spiritual journey .

Scribe: Is there anything else about you that you would like to share with the world? An opportunity for blatant self-promotion!

JG: First, I want to say thank you for this opportunity. Like the old American Express commercials, I am already starting to see that “Membership has its privileges.” I certainly can’t pass on an opportunity to promote my work! So, I want everyone to know my third book, Dance of the Broken, is now available. You can read more about (and order) it and my previous books (My World, My Words: Confessions of a Cluttered Mind and The Book of Jacob) and jacobgrovey.com and globalgeniussociety.com. You can also follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@thejaygrovey) or find The Writings of Jacob Grovey on Facebook. I have many things already in the works for 2017! Thank you in advance for everyone who gives my writing a chance to live.

Thanks, Jacob!

If you’re a Writers’ League member and you’d be interested in being interviewed for our Meet the Members feature, email us at member@writersleague.org for more information. It’s a great way for other members to get to know you and for you to share a bit about what you’re working on!

Meet the Members: Patricia Wright

“I’d love to share lemondrop martinis with Cormac McCarthy. The first question I’d ask him: What is your writing environment like?”

-Patricia Wright

A Writers’ League of Texas Member since July, Patricia Wright lives in Houston, TX.

p-5Scribe: In what genre(s) do you write?

Patricia Wright: Literary historical fiction.

Scribe: What author would you most like to have a drink with, and what’s the first question you would ask them?

PW: I’d love to share lemondrop martinis with Cormac McCarthy. The first question I’d ask him: What is your writing environment like?

Scribe: If you were stranded on a deserted island, what book would you want to have with you to keep you sane?

PW: Trite though it may be, I’d want to have the Complete Works of Shakespeare for its extensive coverage of themes, plots, character types, and historic matter. I’d have a version without annotations, for I’d have plenty of time to simply figure out what the Bard was saying.

Scribe: What have you learned from your association with the Writers’ League?

PW: I’ve only recently learned of, and joined, the League; but I like the fact that its membership is open to those of us who haven’t published yet. I look forward to taking advantage of the many benefits the League has to offer.

Scribe: Where do you see your writing taking you (or you taking it) in the future?

PW: My plan is to write literary historical fiction that would appeal to filmmakers.

Scribe: Here at the Writers’ League, we love sharing book recommendations. What’s one Texas-related book that has come out within the past year that you couldn’t put down?

PW: Hands down, it would be Al Roker’s The Storm of the Century. His is the best and fullest account of the 1900 Galveston hurricane that I’ve ever read.

Scribe: Is there anything else about you that you would like to share with the world? An opportunity for blatant self-promotion!

PW: I’ve been working with a writing coach, who has taught me all the things about fiction-writing that, in the past, I knew I didn’t know. I’m halfway through the first draft of what will probably end up being a trilogy, set in the late 19th century. My coach feels certain that a major publisher will pick it up. (Fingers crossed.)

Thanks, Patricia!

If you’re a Writers’ League member and you’d be interested in being interviewed for our Meet the Members feature, email us at member@writersleague.org for more information. It’s a great way for other members to get to know you and for you to share a bit about what you’re working on!

Instructor Q&A: Stacey Swann

“For years, I tended to think of pre-writing as not ‘real’ writing. Real writing was drafting new scenes. Now I realize how silly and counterproductive this thinking was. There’s lots of magic and inspiration to be found in pre-writing!”

-Stacey Swann

Stacey Swann’s fiction has appeared in Epoch, Memorious, Versal, and other journals. A former Stegner Fellow, she teaches with Stanford University’s Online Writer’s Studio. She’s at work on Olympus, TX, a novel-in-progress she is whittling down from Texas-sized to a more modest Montana or New Mexico size.

Stacey is teaching a class for the Writers’ League of Texas called “The Novel Hatchery: Moving a Novel Idea into Its First Draft” on Saturday, September 24 at St. Edward’s University. This class is designed for students ready for their novels to crack open their shells, grow and fly to completion. Read the interview below and visit the class page to learn more.

swann-photo-2-1Scribe: The blank page can be one of the most intimidating (and exciting) things in the world! Is there a technique a writer might use to move forward if they’re stuck on that very first word.

Stacey Swann: I’m a big fan of freewriting—sitting down with a timer set for 10 or 15 minutes and writing without forethought. Allowing myself to write anything, including bemoaning my lack of ideas and the pile of waiting non-writing work, clears out space for unexpected new ideas to emerge. On the opposite end of the spectrum, I’m also a big fan of specific prompts. Those imposed limitations can make us forget our fear of the blank page because we’ve got something to begin with. There are some great random generators on the internet for this, like this one.

Scribe: What do you mean by pre-writing? How does writing or brainstorming prior to drafting inform the finished draft or manuscript?

SS: Pre-writing is any work outside the draft itself. I think it’s particularly important at the very start of a novel project, but it also can be useful at any stage of drafting. I like to pull my characters out of the scenes and explore their histories and personalities directly. I like to explore the setting from angles that might not be showing up in my actual scenes. And if some piece of the plot isn’t working, I find freewriting about it helps me to brainstorm ideas more successfully than working them out as I draft. For years, I tended to think of this work as not “real” writing. Real writing was drafting new scenes. Now I realize how silly and counterproductive this thinking was. There’s lots of magic and inspiration to be found in pre-writing!

Scribe: Outlining is different for every writer – some writers outline extensively, and others jump right in. What is your preferred method of outlining? Is it consistent from project to project, or does it sometimes change depending on the story?

SS: I’m a big believer that there’s no one-size-fits-all advice for outlining. Some people really do work best with no outline at all, and others really do work best with a very extensive outline. I started as a short story writer, and I never outlined my stories. I loved just following wherever they took me and then tightening the plot arc through revision. I started my novel this way too, but I eventually realized that for me, a novel is simply too big to draft with no outline at all. Partway into the first draft, I found myself adding scenes that weren’t moving the narrative arc forward. I felt like I was treading water. Sketching out a very informal outline helped me start moving again. I think the key is to not let yourself feel bound to your outline, to let it help you move forward while not keeping you closed off from possible new directions that might be a better fit than your original plans.

Scribe: What makes an opening chapter effective? Is it possible to know you’ve got it right before finishing the novel?

SS: An opening chapter has to do two very different things at the same time: establish a strong foundation that grounds the reader and has the heft of a real world while also opening up unanswered questions that make the reader want to keep reading. It’s totally possible to write a chapter that does this well before you’ve finished the first draft. However, I think it’s impossible to know if it is the right opening for your book until you’ve reached the end. For that reason, I encourage my students to not spend a lot of time trying to make their first chapter perfect before they move on. You won’t know if it is perfect until you’ve written to the end!

Thanks, Stacey!

Click here to register for Stacey’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

Meet the Members: Paige Britt

“When I’m in a library, I feel like I’m in a place where anything is possible, where magic can happen and the people around me are fellow believers in the wonder of the world and the power of language. It’s my favorite place to be!”

–Paige Britt

A member of the Writers’ League of Texas since October 2015, Paige Britt lives in Georgetown, TX.

britt_paige_5x7_Scribe: In what genre(s) do you write?

Paige Britt: My first book was a middle-grade fantasy and my second will be a picture book.

Scribe: What authors would you like to have coffee or a beer with and which beverage?

PB: I’d love to have a double-espresso with Brenda Ueland. I get a bolt of energy just reading her, so I can hardly imagine how much fun it would be to pump her full of caffeine and hang out. She’s the author of If You Want to Write, which contains a chapter titled, “Be careless, reckless! Be a lion, be a pirate, when you write.” Alrighty then! She’s also an avid promoter of moodling, which basically means lounging around, staring out the window, doing nothing, and letting your mind wander. Before reading her, I always felt guilty about moodling, but now I’m shameless. It’s an essential part of the creative process and I have Brenda Ueland to thank for reminding me of that. I love her so much that she’s the inspiration behind the Great Moodler in my book The Lost Track of Time.

Scribe: If you were stranded on a deserted island, what book would you want to have with you to keep you sane?

PB: I’m going to cheat and bring the Earthsea Trilogy by Brenda Ueland. (It’s technically three books, but it’s also published as a single volume, so it counts as one.) I’ve been reading this book every few years since I was in my twenties, and it never gets old. It’s high fantasy with wizards, dragons, labyrinths, magic—all that good stuff. But it’s also philosophical, exploring the nature of life and death, shame and courage, defeat and power. It’s a story that works on many levels, which is my favorite kind.

Scribe: What have you learned from your association with the Writers’ League?

PB: The Writers’ League is about providing writers with community and support. It’s about connecting people to opportunities and encouraging them to “be a lion! be a pirate” when they write. Just what I need!

Scribe: Where do you see your writing taking you (or you taking it) in the future?

PB: I see my writing taking me to the library. I love writing in libraries (and Georgetown has an amazing one). When I’m in a library, I feel like I’m in a place where anything is possible, where magic can happen and the people around me are fellow believers in the wonder of the world and the power of language. It’s my favorite place to be!

Scribe: Is there anything else about you that you would like to share with the world? An opportunity for blatant self-promotion!

PB: I wrote a book called The Lost Track of Time, which is marketed to kids 8 to 12 years old, but is really a story for all ages. It’s about a girl who is pressed for time (see, everyone can relate to that!), falls through a hole in her schedule, and discovers the Realm of Possibility. Publishers Weekly gave it a starred review and called it “an exuberant homage to the power of imagination and creative problem-solving . . .” It’s full of adventure, wordplay, and, of course, moodling.

Thanks, Paige!

If you’re a Writers’ League member and you’d be interested in being interviewed for our Meet the Members feature, email us at member@writersleague.org for more information. It’s a great way for other members to get to know you and for you to share a bit about what you’re working on!

Instructor Q&A: Marian Szczepanski

“In this class, I’m making a case for doing more, for making a readily visualized scene, however well-written, more palpable with the addition of details from some, if not all, the other senses…Providing readers with an array of sensory details places them more solidly in the world you’ve evoked solely with words.”

-Marian Szczepanski

Marian Szczepanski, author of the debut novel Playing St. Barbara (High Hill Press, 2013), holds an MFA in fiction from the Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College and a BA in American Studies from the University of Notre Dame. Her short fiction has garnered the deMaine Award for an Emerging Writer from Clackamas Literary Review. She has received fellowships, grants, and awards from Hedgebrook, Vermont Studio Center, the Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow, and the Houston Press Club. Named to the Houston Press roster of “100 Houston Creatives” for 2014, Marian teaches creative writing workshops in Houston at Writespace and beyond.

Marian is teaching a class for the Writers’ League of Texas called “More Than Meets the Eye: Writing the Four Other Senses” on Saturday, September 10 at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX. In this class, students learn how to captivate readers with concrete details. Characters, like readers, have four sense beyond sight, and each one offers the writer countless opportunities to render those characters’ experiences more vividly. Read the interview below and visit the class page to learn more.

Marian SScribe: The class will give strategies for writing descriptions that move beyond the sense of sight–how things look. This sounds like an obvious thing a writer ought to do, and yet it can be surprisingly difficult. Why do you think writers tend to rely on the sense of sight?

Marian Szczepanski: Sight is by far the sense we rely on the most—if we’re not visually compromised in some way that forces us to rely on the other four. If we, as writers, can render a scene readers can readily visualize—clearly “seeing” in their minds’ eyes—we feel as if we’ve done our jobs.  In this class, however, I’m making a case for doing more, for making a readily visualized scene, however well-written, more palpable with the addition of details from some, if not all, the other senses. Imagine the difference between watching a cooking show with the sound turned off and sitting in the kitchen with the cook (or cooking yourself). In the first case, you can see what’s going on, but you may not be familiar with all the ingredients being used or the cooking methods. You can’t hear the sizzle of oil in a skillet or the sound of a knife chopping onions on a wooden cutting board or smell the heated oil or feel the sting as your eyes react to the onions’ fumes.  If you’re the cook, you may also be aware of the moist, sticky onion against your fingertips and, if you’re  an accident-prone cook like me, the sharp burn when the knife slips and slices your thumb.  Providing readers with an array of sensory details places them more solidly in the world you’ve evoked solely with words.

Scribe: Is writing the other senses simply a matter of describing, say, a smell or sound? Or is more required than a sentence like “I could smell the roses”?

MS: Describing sensory impressions can be tough. It’s challenging to come up with the right analogy or metaphor that nails a certain smell or sound. I don’t think there’s a specific prescription for rendering sensory material. The writer’s style and the demands of the narrative drive the way in which s/he handles it. We’ll discuss “how much is too much” when it comes to sensory input, as well as the most effective and creative ways to render it. Sometimes all it takes is one perfectly evocative word. Lauren Groff does this over and over in her novel Fates and Furies.

Scribe: In the class, you’ll be discussing a lot of great writers, including Lily King, Michael Ondaatje, Anthony Doerr, Chitra Divakaruni and Lauren Groff. Is there one particular trait these writers possess–or one particular book that you return to–for great writing about the five senses?

MS: I culled examples from a wide range of writers, but I kept coming back to Fates and Furies. Groff’s style is like nothing I’ve read before, and she excels at one-word sensory metaphors. Anthony Doerr’s novel WWII novel All the Light We Cannot See is a close second, in large part because Marie-Laure, a primary character, is blind. His narrator is omniscient, so he’s free to dispense plenty of visual detail, but when focusing on Marie-Laure, the other senses kick into high gear. We’ll do a brief experiential exercise to help us key into non-visual stimuli and use them in our own work.

Scribe: When you’re working on your own material, do you tend to write from all five senses from the beginning? Or is it something you add through revision?

MS: Sometimes you need to get a draft done before you fully grasp who your characters are and what is at the heart of your story. Then you can approach the second draft with the intention of fleshing out scenes that may have been lightly sketched, adding appropriate sensory details. I go back and forth. I’m a compulsive editor, so I’m constantly scrolling back and tinkering with what immediately came before the scene I’m working on. Sometimes a scene will demand I focus on sensory detail in the first draft. Scenes with highly dramatic content or rising conflict can sharpen characters’ senses. Any scene involving a threat, either from another character or a natural disaster, upends the normal order and thrusts characters into a situation in which they have to make life-or-death decisions, often swiftly, relying on instinct and sensory input as much as intelligence. Characters will key into certain senses at different times, with emotions contributing to this selectivity. We’ll do an exercise examining emotions’ effect on the senses.

Scribe: Your novel, Playing St. Barbara, is about a 1928 coal miner strike, which means its set in a world and contains details (such as coal-products like coke) that not a lot of readers have experienced firsthand. Does that make creating a palpable fictional world that much more important? Is the bar higher for fiction when the readers can’t fill in the blanks based on their own experience?

MS: My goal was to render my novel’s world so vividly readers would feel coke cinders crunch between their teeth. It took nine years of meticulous (some might say “obsessive”) research and rewrites to accomplish this. That said, writers with contemporary settings face much the same challenge. They may not have to send their readers back in time, but they are inviting them to hang out in an imaginary space with imaginary people. Every setting, however mundane, must be created in palpable terms to make it come to life in a reader’s mind. In some ways, rendering a 21st-century suburban kitchen can be a bigger challenge than a 1933 coke yard. How to make that particular kitchen distinctive and yet familiar? And what senses would that particular kitchen evoke in any given character? Fantasy and dystopian fiction writers may have the toughest challenge of all: creating a world from scratch. Even if many of my readers had never visited a mining town, they probably have a sense of what such a town may be like. Not so with speculative fiction’s readers. They’re stepping into a setting they have absolutely no personal connection to or experience with, so they’re depending solely on the writer’s words to take—and keep—them there.

 

Thanks, Marian!

Click here to register for Marian’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

Meet the Members: Jackie Ellis Stewart

“It was only after becoming a senior citizen that I realized I should have spent my life writing, and I now look forward to a writing career rather than retirement.”

–Jackie Ellis Stewart

A member of the Writers’ League of Texas since April, Jackie Ellis Stewart was born in Bastrop, TX, but now lives in Germantown, TN.

jackieellisstewartScribe: In what genre(s) do you write?

Jackie Ellis Stewart: My first book, Raiders and Horse Thieve: Memoir of a Central Texas Baby Boomer, was published last November by Texas A & M Consolidated Press.

Scribe: What authors would you like to have coffee or a beer with and which beverage?

JES: I would invite Will James, Cormac McCarthy, and Larry McMurtry to my fantasy coffee klatch. We’d meet in the early spring of 1959, at my Great Uncle T. C. Watts’ domino parlor, a large portable building set on a corner of the main intersection of downtown Cedar Creek, Texas, where all the leading male citizens meet every week day afternoon at two to play dominos and conduct business.

It would be a tale swapping extravaganza. When he was eleven, T. C.’s father, Perry Watts, Sr., started working as a teamster driving cattle from Bastrop County to San Antonio. He died in 1944 but is still spoken of among the family as though they expect him to walk in the back door any moment. He is the basis for countless tales.  Great-Great Uncle Lee Alexander, Perry Watts’ brother-in-law, is a fixture at the parlor and herded cattle out west for a number of years. If Andy and Mac Alexander (cousins to the Watts men) happened to stop by, they would talk about the drives they made from Bastrop County to the train in Austin to take their herd to St. Louis. They forded the Colorado River about where the Montopolis Bridge stands today and rode all the way to St. Louis in the cattle car. Once the herd was sold, they had their first barbershop haircut.

If T.C.’s brother, Chester, joins the group, the coffee may be served with a dollop of something a bit stronger. Chester, the token alcoholic of the family, is also a chain smoker who drives a gasoline tanker truck for Jack Ritter. I’m the only one in the family who sees any potential for a problem with this.

Scribe: If you were stranded on a deserted island, what book would you want to have with you to keep you sane?

JES: Since I get seasick wading, there’s no chance in hell I’d ever have the opportunity to get stuck on a deserted island, but if by some fluke I did, a sizeable water-proof case would float ashore after me containing a full set of Compton’s Encyclopedia published sometime in the 1930’s or ‘40’s. I grew up with just such a set. It had stories and discussed every possible subject along with instructions on how to do most anything. It would keep me entertained and help me to either get off the island or make myself more comfortable there.

Scribe: What have you learned from your association with the Writers’ League?

JES: I learned about the June Agents & Editors Conference through the Writers’ League newsletter and was excited to have the opportunity to learn more about my craft.

Scribe: Where do you see your writing taking you (or you taking it) in the future?

JES: It was only after becoming a senior citizen that I realized I should have spent my life writing, and I now look forward to a writing career rather than retirement. My current novel has the potential to be the first of a trilogy.

Scribe: Here at the Writers’ League, we love sharing book recommendations. What’s one Texas-related book that has come out within the past year that you couldn’t put down?

JES: In a Narrow Grave: Essays on Texas by Larry McMurtry is a great read for any Texan in search of explanations for the Texas attitude and values. Soon as I read the first chapter, I put out an all-points bulletin to two high school friends back in Texas who swap book titles with me. I can hardly wait to hear their reactions.

Scribe: Is there anything else about you that you would like to share with the world? An opportunity for blatant self-promotion!

JES: I’m currently re-writing my first novel. Please visit my website at jackieellisstewart.com to learn more about my book and see some snapshots from my everyday life. There might even be one of George, our better than standard poodle.

Thanks, Jackie!

If you’re a Writers’ League member and you’d be interested in being interviewed for our Meet the Members feature, email us at member@writersleague.org for more information. It’s a great way for other members to get to know you and for you to share a bit about what you’re working on!