5 Questions for Liz Garton Scanlon

“I’ve come to a much fuller understanding of where good plot originates — from deep inside a character — and that’s been transformational for me.”

-Liz Garton Scanlon

Liz Garton Scanlon is the author of more than a dozen beloved picture books, including the Caldecott-honored and best-selling All the World, and her newest releases — Bob, Not Bob and Another Way to Climb a Tree. She is on the faculty of the Vermont College of Fine Arts and is a frequent and popular presenter at schools, festivals and conferences.

On September 30, Liz will teach “The Secret to Great Picture Books” at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX. This class will introduce strategies for making children’s books children centered and how to catch the eye of a tough industry. We asked Liz about the books she’s learned from, challenges she’s faced in her own work, and what people will take away from the class.

What is a book that you recommend to people over and over? What makes it so compelling?

I often recommend the picture book Seven Silly Eaters, by Mary Ann Hoberman and illustrated by Marla Frazee, to folks interested in writing rhyme as I think it’s an exquisite example of following a set scheme and meter, while still being wildly imaginative, playful and sophisticated with story and language. I also recommend Dear Genius: The Leters of Ursula Nordstrom to anyone who ever asks, “Why write for kids?”

In your own work, what has been one challenge posed by the craft, structure, voice, etc., of a book that you’ve had to puzzle out?

I think in my transition from poet to children’s author, the biggest leap was, “Why does something always have to happen?” I’m only sort of kidding. I felt so bullied by plot. But I’ve come to a much fuller understanding of where good plot originates — from deep inside a character — and that’s been transformational for me.

Has there been a moment of epiphany in terms of your work, when you thought, “This is it! Now I know what I’m doing?” How long did that feeling last?

Ha ha. Oh, there have been lots of lovely and magical moments of epiphany! But they are neither lasting, nor do they convince me that I know what I’m doing. They do serve as a reminder, though, to keep showing up for work, both doggedly but also open to whatever little miracles might arise.

What piece of advice do you find yourself giving to writers again and again?

Read your work aloud.

What is one thing that people will take away from this class?

I hope everyone will walk away with lots of really useable, practical lessons and parameters and information. But more than that, I hope they’ll leave with an irresistible urge to try writing picture books.

Thanks, Liz!

 

Click here to learn more about and register for Liz’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

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5 Questions for Chaitali Sen

“There has to be someone or more than one person (but not too many) that readers can latch on to. Reading a book is like going to a new school. You don’t want to wander the halls alone.”

-Chaitali Sen

Chaitali Sen is the author of The Pathless Sky. Her short stories, reviews, and essays have appeared in New England Review, New Ohio Review, Colorado Review, The Aerogram, Los Angeles Review of Books, and other journals. Formerly an elementary school teacher, she has developed writing workshops for children, adolescents, and adults in Boston, New York, and Austin.

On September 23, Chaitali will teach “Creating Protagonists Your Readers Will Follow” at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX. This class will introduce strategies for giving readers an emotional connection to characters by developing characters’ contradictions and creating situations that make life hard for the character. We asked Chaitali about the books she’s learned from, challenges she’s faced in her own work, and what people will take away from the class.

What is a book that you recommend to people over and over? What makes it so compelling?

In the last few years the books I recommend most often are Elena Ferrante’s Neopolitan novels, which I believe was written as one novel that was thousands of pages long. They were published as four novels, starting with My Brilliant Friend and ending with The Story of the Lost Child. Many people have written about these novels more articulately than I can. They are page-turners tracing the friendship of two women in post-WWII Italy, with some melodramatic and operatic twists and coincidences, but they also deeply explore big questions about patriarchy and the roles of women and men in society, the nature of genius, the subtle shifts in power between individuals, the various ways economic and sexual oppression affect people’s lives on an intimate level, and so much more. I’ve never been to Naples, but they also evoke a feeling of a very particular place.

The two main characters, Elena and Lila, are constantly straining against the norms of society and the limitations placed on them. Sometimes they break out of them and sometimes they accommodate to them in surprising ways. For me, reading these four books were as immersive and joyful as reading the Harry Potter series, which I read as an adult during summer breaks from teaching in New York. By the end of the summer I would be struggling to come out of what I came to call, “The Harry Potter daze.”

In your own work, what has been one challenge posed by the craft, structure, voice, etc., of a book that you’ve had to puzzle out?

I have those a lot but I’m not always right! The feeling that I now know what I’m doing never lasts long. About 24 hours if I’m lucky. But sure, sometimes you have a breakthrough that solves a major problem. Sometimes solving one problem creates three others that are not as major but have to be solved nonetheless. It’s a constant process of problem-solving.

Has there been a moment of epiphany in terms of your work, when you thought, “This is it! Now I know what I’m doing?” How long did that feeling last?

All my novels are a series of epiphanies strung between long stretches of clueless fumbling. Usually those epiphanies are in regards to a character’s motivation, a plot point, or an important piece of worldbuilding. The chemical rush of the “ah-ha!” moment tends to last a day or so, but the memory of it keeps me going for weeks or months, hunting for the next one.

What piece of advice do you find yourself giving to writers again and again?

Keep it simple in terms of structure. I find there isn’t that much to be gained from playing around wildly with structure, especially in fiction. It’s been trendy to go back and forth in time or have five different characters tell a story, but it isn’t always clear why the author chose that structure. Sometimes it seems like they wrote a bunch of short stories and wanted to slap them together into a novel for marketing purposes. Sometimes people try to settle on an unconventional structure that becomes really paralyzing because you come to a point where you don’t know what you should write next. The reason you don’t know what you should write next is because you’re all over the place and you don’t know where the story is actually going.  I write chronologically. This happens, then this happens, and that causes this to happen, and so on. Now, in my novel I did have a prologue that was a kind of flash forward, but that came in later drafts after I had already written the whole chronology of what happens.

Traditional story structure is actually not that easy to pull off. Working towards a climax is challenging enough. Get through that challenge a few times and then maybe experiment with other structures.

What is one thing that people will take away from this class?

That there is no story without strong, compelling characters. There has to be someone or more than one person (but not too many) that readers can latch on to. Reading a book is like going to a new school. You don’t want to wander the halls alone.

Thanks, Chaitali!

 

Click here to learn more about and register for Chaitali’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

5 Questions for Amanda Downum, Speculative Fiction Writer

“Put your best effort into a story, but don’t fixate on making it perfect or even saleable. If you find yourself revising over and over again, move on to a new project. Stretch new muscles.”

-Amanda Downum

Amanda Downum is the author of the Necromancer Chronicles—The Drowning City, The Bone Palace, and Kingdoms of Dust—published by Orbit Books, and Dreams of Shreds & Tatters, from Solaris. Her short fiction has appeared in Strange HorizonsRealms of FantasyWeird Tales, and elsewhere.

On September 16, Amanda, along with fellow author Marshall Ryan Maresca, will teach “Worldbuilding for Speculative Fiction” at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX. This class will introduce strategies for building a fictional world that readers don’t know, either because you invented it or because they’ve never been there. We asked Amanda about the books she’s learned from, challenges she’s faced in her own work, and what people will take away from the class.

What is a book that you recommend to people over and over? What makes it so compelling?

Elizabeth Bear’s Range of Ghosts is one of my favorites. There are many plot elements that might be familiar to fantasy readers—a quest, a princess, a kidnapped love—but the world and characters are rich and nuanced and elegantly drawn, and the setting is refreshingly different.

In your own work, what has been one challenge posed by the craft, structure, voice, etc., of a book that you’ve had to puzzle out?

For me the challenge of every novel is the middle. I’ve introduced characters, given them goals and obstacles, complicated the situation, and then . . . I find myself confronted with a vast selection of choices: what happens next, whose is the best POV to tell it, what secrets are the characters keeping, how quickly do events occur? Answering these questions correctly gives the book the momentum that carries it to The End. Getting hung up on a wrong answer—or a wrong question—usually leaves me stuck for weeks. And this puzzle repeats itself for every novel or story I write.

Has there been a moment of epiphany in terms of your work, when you thought, “This is it! Now I know what I’m doing?” How long did that feeling last?

All my novels are a series of epiphanies strung between long stretches of clueless fumbling. Usually those epiphanies are in regards to a character’s motivation, a plot point, or an important piece of worldbuilding. The chemical rush of the “ah-ha!” moment tends to last a day or so, but the memory of it keeps me going for weeks or months, hunting for the next one.

What piece of advice do you find yourself giving to writers again and again?

Finishing work and learning from it is one of the best ways to grow as a writer. Put your best effort into a story, but don’t fixate on making it perfect or even saleable. If you find yourself revising over and over again, move on to a new project. Stretch new muscles.

What is one thing that people will take away from this class?

Hopefully, different ways to think about worldbuilding and to let it gracefully find its way into a story.

Thanks, Amanda!

 

Click here to learn more about and register for Amanda’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

5 Questions for Marshall Ryan Maresca, Fantasy Writer

“Every book has a moment, where everything just clicks—you know all the beats that remain to get you to the end. And at that point it’s mostly a matter of getting it out of your fingers.”

-Marshall Ryan Maresca

Marshall Ryan Maresca is the author of the novels, The Thorn of Dentonhill and A Murder of Mages, each of which begins its own fantasy series set in the port city of Maradaine. His work has appeared in the Norton Anthology of Hint Fiction and Rick Klaw’s anthology Rayguns Over Texas. He has had several short plays produced and has worked as a stage actor, a theatrical director, and an amateur chef.

On September 16, Marshall, along with fellow author Amanda Downum, will teach “Worldbuilding for Speculative Fiction” at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX. This class will introduce strategies for building a fictional world that readers don’t know, either because you invented it or because they’ve never been there. We asked Marshall about the books he’s learned from, challenges he’s faced in his own work, and what people will take away from the class.

What is a book that you recommend to people over and over? What makes it so compelling?

I don’t have to recommend it much, because it’s an enduring classic, but Watership Down is the book I constantly go back to. It stands out, not just for its gorgeous storytelling and impeccable craft, but for the rich world building that is woven throughout it. It’s the gold standard for creating a culture that is both utterly foreign yet immersive.

In your own work, what has been one challenge posed by the craft, structure, voice, etc., of a book that you’ve had to puzzle out?

The biggest thing I struggle with is the connective tissue, getting the characters from place A to place B in an organic way. For example, if I need two characters to independently reach the same place, I have to work out how each of them reach that conclusion, beyond the obvious Hand-Of-The-Author pushing them there.

Has there been a moment of epiphany in terms of your work, when you thought, “This is it! Now I know what I’m doing?” How long did that feeling last?

Every book has a moment, where everything just clicks — you know all the beats that remain to get you to the end. And at that point it’s mostly a matter of getting it out of your fingers. Usually that lasts until the end of the book. Not always, but usually.

What piece of advice do you find yourself giving to writers again and again?

That I can’t teach you your process of writing— I can only show you my toolbox, and let that help you discover your process.

What is one thing that people will take away from this class?

That worldbuilding is not only a vital element of speculative fiction, but that the process of it can be an engaging activity, and the application of it in prose doesn’t need to be lifeless recitations of details.

Thanks, Marshall!

 

Click here to learn more about and register for Marshall’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

5 Questions for Publicist Marika Flatt

“There are many ways to promote a book, and they all don’t have to be about doing broadcast interviews or in-person signings.”

-Marika Flatt

Marika Flatt launched PR by the Book, LLC in 2002, combining her love of the media, public relations, and books. Marika received a Gold Bulldog Award for a publicity campaign that resulted in exposure in over 700 media outlets. She is the recipient of an Austin Public Relations Society of America Outstanding Mentor Award, the Anne D. Robinson Creative Initiative Award, and a nominee for “Profiles in Power,” and she serves on the selection committee for the Texas Book Festival.

On September 9, she is teaching a class, along with fellow publicist Elena Meredith, for the Writers’ League called “Rock Star Publicity: Book Promotion for the Bold and Bashful” at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX. This class will introduce promotional strategies for the assertive author and promotional alternatives for those who don’t like being in the limelight. We asked Marika about the authors whose publicity she is following now and the past promotional projects that have worked well for her, as well as what people can expect from her class.

Who is an author that you’ve noticed doing interesting things in marketing their books?

Michelle Tam of NomNom Paleo fame released her new cookbook this month and has done amazing things through her own marketing for Ready or Not. She has mobilized her own fan base village through weekly newsletters, a nationwide tour that she’s promoted to her fans built from her previous book, made herself accessible to those fans through her social media and getting in front of them at events. She uses video (of her cooking her recipes), brings her family into the scene (so that fans feel they really know her family), and sends out discount codes (even for InstaPots).

What would you say to writers who are dreading the publicity part of publication? Can it be enjoyable for someone who isn’t a natural marketer?

Yes, there are many ways to promote a book and they all don’t have to be about doing broadcast interviews or in-person signings. We’ve been enjoying working with novelist Leah Harper Bowron from the Houston area, to promote her release Colorblind. We’ve been successful in placing pre-written Q&As like this one with Texas Lifestyle Magazine. Also, because the book is targeted to a YA audience, we orchestrated a successful blog tour so that she’s had a great groundswell of promotion, without her having to be out there doing radio/TV or book signings all over the place (although she has done a few).

What is one project that you’ve worked on in the past that has gotten publicity beyond your expectations? How did it happen?

We have worked with Patagonia Books for over 5 years (nonstop). In June 2016, they published The Aloha Shirt: Spirit of the Islands by Dale Hope, the complete book on the most enduring souvenir ever invented. Hope’s authoritative book recounts the colorful stories behind these marvelous shirts: as cultural icons, evocative of the mystery and the allure of the islands, capturing the vibe of the waterman culture and lifestyle—casual, relaxed, and fun. Originally published in 2000, the new edition features more photos and new material, including an introduction by surfing legend Gerry Lopez and contributions from Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard.

Some top hits:
  1. The New York Times Culture & Style section. Considering that The New York Times Book Review only reviews 30 of the 1000 books they receive each week, we always approach editors in other sections of the paper. This book had so many different angles we could pitch (fashion, travel, Hawaiian culture) – the Culture & Style editor responded to a pitch and interviewed the author about the history of the Hawaiian shirt.
  2. Conde Naste Traveler. Again, working those various angles, travel media was very enthusiastic about this book on Hawaiiana. A pitch via email also resulted in an interview with the author.
  3. Where Guestbooks in Hawai’i (Oahu, Maui, Kauai, Hawai’i Island). You know those hardcover books found in hotel rooms? This was a rare and unique opportunity to have a spread on the book for an entire year in hotel rooms across Hawai’i. This came about  about five months after the campaign had officially wrapped up, through the book getting a lot of local media coverage in Hawai’i, and the author working his connections. An editor in California approached the author directly about this opportunity and worked with us on getting images for a 8-page spread into their 2017-2018 editions.

What piece of advice do you find yourself giving to writers again and again?

Use social media platforms to build your audience. Focus on two max. Start early; build it before you have something important to say. Use the 80/20 rule: be conversational and informative 80% of the time; be selling 20% of the time (through your social media posts).

What is one thing that people will take away from this class?

We’re designing this class to be very interactive. We believe in the power of a brilliant brainstorm. We’ll talk about what works for us publicizing books, then show you how to create those materials for yourself. We’ll talk about why it’s important to pitch the way we do, then show you how to implement some of the tools we use.

Thanks, Marika!

 

Click here to learn more about and register for Marika’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

5 Questions for Greg Garrett

“If you’re a writer, write. Don’t write for publication, let alone success. “

-Greg Garrett

Greg Garrett is the author of over twenty books of fiction, nonfiction, and memoir, including the acclaimed novels Free Bird, Cycling, Shame, and The Prodigal. He teaches fiction writing and screenwriting at Baylor University.

On September 2, he is teaching a class for the Writers’ League called “Better Novel Beginnings Through Character Development” at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX. This class will offer exercises for introducing plot and complications at the beginning of a novel. Here’s what Greg is reading now, some of the problems he’s overcome as a writer, and what people can expect from his class.

What is a book that you recommend to people over and over? What makes it so compelling?

I’m teaching Ernest Gaines’ A Lesson Before Dying again this fall in a literature class at Baylor, and it’s an amazing little novel that ticks like a clock because of the way the problems and character yearnings are set up so powerfully at the outset. It does a great job of translating the Hero’s Journey for its two main characters, and I love that both main characters are complex. At first, we don’t actually like either of them that much, but we understand a little bit about how and why they’re broken, and I’ve found that goes a long way toward eventual reader sympathy.

In your own work, what has been one challenge posed by the craft, structure, voice, etc., of a book that you’ve had to puzzle out?

Plot and structure remain my biggest challenges. I learned to write fiction by writing short stories, which have many of the same elements as novels, but if you’re a literary short story writer, as I was, you don’t have to learn much about plotting. I spend so much time talking and teaching about story beats, character arcs, and the Hero’s Journey because I need to be reminded of it myself.

I wrote Shame, my third published novel, some years ago, and not only wrote it almost twice too long, but for many years didn’t know how to solve the problems in it because it was without a strong shape. When I wrote The Prodigal in 2013, not only was I operating on an unexpectedly tight deadline, but I didn’t have the usual time to let the story and characters gestate that I’d done in the past. But I did know enough now about successful story models for long narratives to bang out most of the things that needed to happen to Jack Chisholm, my main character, if he was going to go from Point A to Point Z.

Has there been a moment of epiphany in terms of your work, when you thought, “This is it! Now I know what I’m doing?” How long did that feeling last?

Actually, I first have a negative epiphany, which is that on everything I’ve written—20+ books now—there has been a moment about halfway through the writing when I’ve thought to myself, “Oh my God, what am I doing? This was a mistake. I’ve wasted a year of my LIFE. I don’t know how to solve this book. I’ll NEVER know how to solve it.” And then, with each of them, fiction and nonfiction, there came a moment when things did come together, when I could see the path. For me the strongest emotional moment is at the end of the book, when if everything has worked out, you have a powerful emotional reaction that you hope will be matched in the reader. And that lasts for a little while. I love those moments, because a lot of the time, even when the writing is going well, it is brutally hard. We do need those rewards.

What piece of advice do you find yourself giving to writers again and again?

If you’re a writer, write. Don’t write for publication, let alone success. Don’t write because you want the crowd to carry you on their shoulders around the town square or to get invited to the best parties. All of those things are out of your control. What you can do is orient your life and the lives of the people who love you around this one act, and do this act over and over. The more you do it, the better you’ll get at it, and the more likely someone will someday carry you around the town square. But the writing has to be your focus and your reward, because that’s all we’re ever guaranteed.

What is one thing that people will take away from this class?

I love teaching people about story beginnings because they’re so vital. I want people in this particular class to learn some strategies for complicating their characters, and to see how those will complicate—and enrich—their storylines. Stories are about people, and as Amy Tan says, the more broken they are, the more interesting they are to write about. Come and learn about human brokenness and human yearning—tough concepts in life, but essential in fiction!

Thanks, Greg!

 

Click here to learn more about and register for Greg’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

Instructor Q&A: Nan Cuba

“The beginning of a story functions as a microcosm of the whole.”

-Nan Cuba

Nan Cuba is teaching a class for the Writers’ League called “Crafting Openings that Hook the Reader” on June 3 at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX. This class will focus on analyzing opening pages of texts to give writers strategies to better hook readers within the first few lines and pages of their own projects. Read the interview below and visit the class page to learn more.

Scribe: Are there any common patterns within opening pages that you find most effective and would like to bring to writers’ attention?

NC: The two most important parts of a story are the opening and closing. The opening places the reader in the fictional world, whether realistic or fantastic, current or historical or futuristic, establishing guidelines for understanding what will follow. The protagonist, setting, situation, tone, atmosphere, theme, structure, and narrative voices are introduced. For example, Janet Burroway says the first paragraphs should reveal the character’s gender, age, race or nationality, class, period, region, profession, and marital status, but none of this should be given as information. Instead, it must be implied by appearance, tone, action, or detail.

According to Robbie Macauley, the design of the opening should suggest the story’s design. For example, if the first paragraphs are exchanges of dialogue as people discuss something about their lives, the implication is that the story will be about their attitudes and opinions, that the way they express them will be important. If the opening brings one character forward for the readers to observe, then the story will be about the traits, ideas, experiences, and emotions of that person. If a group opens the story by participating in an event, then the characters’ actions will become the focus. Opening with a generalization signals a story’s emphasis on theme. A reminiscent narrative voice signals a story about an incidents that was life changing. In this way, the beginning of a story functions as a microcosm of the whole.

Scribe: If you had to choose one novel as having your favorite opening pages, which would it be and why?

NC: I’m going to change your question a bit. Instead of focusing on “opening pages,” I’ll share opening lines to three classic novels.

Opening lines should operate much like opening paragraphs but in compressed form. One of the most famous first sentences is found in Leo Tolstoy’s novel, Anna Karenina. The omniscient narrator begins with a generalization: “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” Readers immediately recognize the truth in this observation then realize the story will be about one of these unhappy families, with details about how it got that way. The sentence establishes point of view, introduces the main characters, hints at the conflict, and suggests the theme.
Another famous first sentence is from George Orwell’s 1984: “It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.” Since the novel was published in 1949, the title announces this as a futuristic setting, while the opening announces that bad luck is everywhere. Point of view, setting, and conflict are established.
A third example is from Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man: “I am an invisible man.” The reader knows that the story will be told by a first-person narrator, who thinks no one sees him. We don’t know why, but we know his invisibility is the conflict. We find out later that his color makes him socially invisible, so the first sentence also introduces theme.

Scribe: Implicit in this class and these examples is that writers need to learn to continually teach themselves how to write–by reading other great writers. Why is it important to practice reading like a writer?

Nan Cuba: Learning the craft of fiction writing is a lifetime pursuit. Like anyone being trained in a skill, we hope for instructions to practice and then confidently use to launch a professional career. But mastering craft is not like learning to drive a car, memorizing which pedals and handles to push, and then breezily moving along. A serious writer doesn’t rely on formulas or trends, but instead learns fundamentals of language usage, grammar, and storytelling, and then applies knowledge, curiosity, and intuition in order to experiment and challenge oneself, resulting in the development of an individual style, one that, like the writer herself, is ever-changing. Proficiency introduces new craft challenges, while the writer constantly strives for originality and innovation. Understanding plot basics leads to de-familiarization; recognizing melodrama’s exaggerations entices one to effectively include it; an expanded vocabulary and facility with language and diction challenge one to experiment with syntax and voice. A person could continuously take classes, but the best teacher shows her students how to teach themselves. Chekhov didn’t have a writing degree; neither does Jonathan Franzen. So, how did they learn craft? By reading like a writer. That means analyzing words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, characterizations, settings, plot devices, points of view, etc., noting what works and how it’s accomplished. Francine Prose meticulously describes the process in her excellent book, Reading Like a Writer.

Scribe: Reading definitely helps develop writing skills, but not all reading is good or appropriate writing; is there anything to be gained from reading works in which the writing style is not well crafted?

NC: Not really. If you read literary fiction — that is, fiction that emphasizes language and character, as opposed to commercial fiction that focuses on plot — and you analyze its operations, much like a medial student observes a surgeon in the operating room or a doctoral student assists a chemist in the laboratory, over time and with practice, you will come to recognize literary craft workings. That way, when you knowingly read popular fiction for entertainment, which we all occasionally do, much like watching a blockbuster Star Wars movie, you recognize shortcuts and manipulations, the story becoming predictable and flashy, a fun diversion that ultimately confirms your dedication to innovate and challenge yourself, to write stories that reveal nuanced aspects of our common human experience, in other words, to create art.

Thanks, Nan!

Click here to register for Nan’s class.

Click here for our current class schedule.

 

About the Instructor

Nan Cuba is the author of Body and Bread, winner of the PEN Southwest Award in Fiction and the Texas Institute of Letters Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction, co-editor of Art at our Doorstep: San Antonio Writers and Artists. Her work has appeared in Antioch ReviewHarvard ReviewColumbiaChicago Tribune’s Printer’s Row, LIFEThird Coast, and D Magazine. She has received a Dobie Paisano Fellowship, an artist residency at Fundación Valparaiso in Spain, and was a finalist for the Humanities Texas Award for Individual Achievement. She is the founder and executive director emeritus of Gemini Ink, a nonprofit literary center, and teaches in the MA/MFA Program in Literature, Creative Writing, and Social Justice at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, where is writer-in-residence. Her website is nancuba.com.