Meet the Conference Faculty: Jeff Silberman

“This past year I also helped two authors become television writers and executive producers for series based on their books.”

-Jeff Silberman

Every year, the Writers’ League of Texas brings a faculty of close to thirty agents, editors, and other industry professionals to Austin for its Agents & Editors Conference. As we look ahead to the 25th Annual A&E Conference, taking place June 29–July 1, 2018, we’re happy to share Q&As with some of our faculty here.

An Interview with Jeff Silberman

Jeff Silberman is a new horizon hunter. He began his career as an entertainment attorney and navigates the film and television worlds as well as publishing. His interests are wide, his passions run deep, and the books he represents cut a wide swath: narrative non-fiction, memoir, science and technology, history, social issues, sports, the animal kingdom, literary fiction, upmarket fiction, and more. He seek s books that in some way leave us different than we were before, and he works closely with all of his authors.

 Scribe: How would you describe your personal approach to working with an author?

Jeff Silberman: I work closely with all my authors, from the conception of an idea to unearthing how that idea actually becomes a book; providing editorial notes and suggestions from characters and themes in narrative books to arguments and solutions in policy an prescriptive books; crafting marketing plans, and creating opportunities in film and television for both scripted and unscripted projects. (This past year I also helped two authors become television writers and executive producers for series based on their books.)

Scribe: What do you look for in a debut author?

JS: A compelling idea or premise, a unique voice and talent, a good heart and mind, and a personal connection.

Scribe: If you could give writers one piece of advice, what would it be?

JS: Follow your heart. Live your dream.

Scribe: Has there been a project you took on because there was something special or unique about it, even though it wasn’t like projects you usually take on?

JS: All the time. Take me somewhere I haven’t been,

Scribe:  Tell us about a recent book that you worked with–you know, brag on one of your writers!

JS: The Blood of Patriots published this past fall and also received 9 offers for film and television rights before it published. Set in Alaska, it is the true story of Bill Fulton, a diehard Army vet who did a lot of off the books missions during his Army career, and after his discharge opened up a surplus supply store and fugitive recovery business and wound up going undercover for the FBI to infiltrate a right wing militia group plotting to kill judges and law enforcement officers. It is both wildly funny and deadly serious.  Seemingly a total testosterone story, but written by a woman – Jeanne Devon. Jeannie’s writing was so compelling, so smart,  so funny, and so easy to read, that though she had never written a page for television before, she is writing a one hour pilot script and will executive produce the series with Bill.

Thanks, Jeff!

Click here to read our 2018 A&E Conference agent bios.

Click here for more information on the 2018 Agents & Editors Conference, a weekend long event in Austin, TX (June 29-July 1) that focuses on the craft of writing, the business of publishing, and building a literary community.

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Meet the Conference Faculty: Rachel Orr

“I love to discover authors and illustrators who have a strong, earnest love for their work and have many stories in mind, as opposed to a one-hit wonder.”

-Rachel Orr

Every year, the Writers’ League of Texas brings a faculty of close to thirty agents, editors, and other industry professionals to Austin for its Agents & Editors Conference. As we look ahead to the 25th Annual A&E Conference, taking place June 29–July 1, 2018, we’re happy to share Q&As with some of our faculty here.

An Interview with Rachel Orr

Rachel Orr is celebrating her eleventh year at Prospect Agency, where she represents both authors and illustrators in projects ranging from picture books through YA. She previously worked for eight rewarding years at HarperCollins Children’s Books and uses those editorial skills to help prepare her clients’ work for submission. Her clients include Kit Alloway (the Dream Walker series), Samantha M. Clark (The Boy, the Boat and the Beast), Cori Doerrfeld (The Rabbit Listened), Emma Wunsch (The Movie Version), and Kim Zarins (Sometimes We Tell the Truth). Rachel lives in Hoboken, New Jersey, with her husband and two young children. She has no spare time, but, if she did, she would spend it dancing, running and reading, of course.

 Scribe: How would you describe your personal approach to working with an author?

Rachel Orr: Every client works differently, so I usually tailor my approach to the specific needs and desires of the author or illustrator. However, in general, I tend to work very closely with my clients, specifically during the editorial stage. This is something I really enjoy, especially given my experience of working as an editor at HarperCollins Children’s Books for eight years. I also like developing personal relationships with my clients. Again, it’s not necessary—many writers and illustrators prefer their space, and that’s fine—but I do find that good communication is helpful. It’s also useful to know what is going on in their lives, which can better help me to help them. Plus, it’s another aspect of the job that I really enjoy. Many clients have become good friends of mine.

Scribe: What do you look for in a debut author?

RO: I love to discover authors and illustrators who have a strong, earnest love for their work and have many stories in mind, as opposed to a one-hit wonder. This is especially important at Prospect Agency, since we’re looking to foster a client’s entire career, rather than a single title. Knowledge of the industry is always a plus, as is an ability to balance a positive attitude with realistic expectations. Publishing is still a business, after all—for better or worse—and I’ve found that the clients who are most successful are those who have come to terms with that fact, while also staying true to their craft. Most importantly, I’m looking for someone who is willing to do the hard work that it takes to succeed.

Scribe: If you could give writers one piece of advice, what would it be?

RO: Along the lines above, I would say being aware of the market without writing to it. I realize that it can be tempting to follow trends, but when writers intentionally do so, those stories almost always comes across sounding derivative. Not comparing oneself to other writers and illustrators—no matter what stage or your career you’re in—is another piece of advice that I would give to anyone. Everyone’s publishing journey is unique, and while it’s fine to have aspirations, wishing to be in someone else’s shoes is hardly ever a healthy attitude.

Scribe: Has there been a project you took on because there was something special or unique about it, even though it wasn’t like projects you usually take on?

RO: There are some illustrator clients whose work is vastly different than the more commercial art I tend to be drawn to. But there was something so striking about their art that I just couldn’t resist!

Scribe:  Tell us about a recent book that you worked with–you know, brag on one of your writers!

RO: Well, of course, I can’t wait for the launch of the debut middle-grade novel The Boy, The Boat and the Beast (Simon & Schuster/June 2018) by Austin’s own Samantha M. Clark.  I remember reading the manuscript for the first time and absolutely falling in love with it. So I was thrilled when Sam and I visited the S&S offices recently and were surrounded by publishing professionals who loved the book just as much as we do! I’m also very excited for Cori Doerrfeld’s picture book, The Rabbit Listened (Dial/February 2018), which is a beautiful—and important—book about grief. I’ve represented Cori for over a decade now, and she has published many wonderful stories, but I’m hoping this will be a real break-out book for her. On the flipside, I’m looking forward to another client’s author-illustrator debut with her book entitled Underwear (still to be announced. Stay tuned for that!). It’s about, well …underwear. It’s completely not a serious book, but it is 100% completely kid-friendly and will cause many giggles to ensue, which makes this an important book in its own special way, too.

Thanks, Rachel!

Click here to read our 2018 A&E Conference agent bios.

Click here for more information on the 2018 Agents & Editors Conference, a weekend long event in Austin, TX (June 29-July 1) that focuses on the craft of writing, the business of publishing, and building a literary community.

Meet the Conference Faculty: Grace A. Ross

“I do not shy away from a book that has potential but needs revision.”

-Grace A. Ross

Every year, the Writers’ League of Texas brings a faculty of close to thirty agents, editors, and other industry professionals to Austin for its Agents & Editors Conference. As we look ahead to the 25th Annual A&E Conference, taking place June 29–July 1, 2018, we’re happy to share Q&As with some of our faculty here.

An Interview with Grace A. Ross

Grace A. Ross recently joined Regal Hoffmann & Associates, a boutique agency that represents quality literary fiction, narrative nonfiction, biography, journalism, politics, and social history. She was previously at Denise Shannon Literary Agency and Barbara Lowenstein Associates. Grace is interested in literary fiction that experiments with form and speaks to the current cultural climate; historical fiction; international narratives; and dynamic plots that bridge genres. In nonfiction, she is looking for socially and politically conscious narratives, especially those that engage with cultural conversations about gender, race, and class in an accessible way; but she’s also drawn to popular science, biography, cultural theory, and memoir.

 Scribe: How would you describe your personal approach to working with an author?

Grace A. Ross: Hands on when it comes to editorial work – I do not shy away from a book that has potential but needs revision. I have a unique individual relationship with each of my clients so that I can be the best possible advocate. In some cases that means sending cat gifs for inspiration, and in others, it means setting up frequent phone calls to brainstorm ideas or noodle out a plot or thesis. The idea is that I’ll be working with my authors over the course of their entire career, so I want to get to know each of my clients and their specific needs deeply.

Scribe: What do you look for in a debut author?

GR: An author who thrives while working with an editorial partner but who doesn’t need close line editing. The process from manuscript to book-on-the-shelf can be a long and frustrating process, so I also appreciate an author who shows enthusiasm and continues to put in effort even when the going gets tough.

Scribe: If you could give writers one piece of advice, what would it be?

GR: Try to stay positive! If you don’t initially find representation or a book doesn’t sell, know that you can always revise or start working on something new. Of course, it can be so frustrating when something you’ve worked hard on doesn’t get liftoff, but sometimes it’s worth putting a project aside and finding something fresh to work on. You can always return to that original project later down the road.

Scribe: Has there been a project you took on because there was something special or unique about it, even though it wasn’t like projects you usually take on?

GR: Last fall, a referral for a debut mystery dropped into my inbox. I’m not usually in the market for mysteries or thrillers, but the concept really caught my eye. The author was writing about a young wine sommelier who fakes rare wine, very similar to Rudy Kurniawan who was sentenced in 2013 to 10 years in prison for selling millions of dollars of fake rare vintages. The writing was gripping, and the details were so tantalizing – the author clearly did a lot of research, especially for the historical sections. I had just vacationed in the south of France and fallen in love with the wine there so it couldn’t have been a more perfectly timed query! I immediately offered representation and she accepted.

Scribe:  Tell us about a recent book that you worked with–you know, brag on one of your writers!

GR: Speaking of the wine book above, I just recently sold it Seven Street Books. I couldn’t be more pleased to work on a book out of my typical milieu and have it land at the perfect place!

Thanks, Grace!

Click here to read our 2018 A&E Conference agent bios.

Click here for more information on the 2018 Agents & Editors Conference, a weekend long event in Austin, TX (June 29-July 1) that focuses on the craft of writing, the business of publishing, and building a literary community.

Meet the Conference Faculty: Agent Dana Murphy

“I’m often asked: ‘How do I create a voice that agents want?’ But at the heart of finding your voice is authenticity. It’s not about writing what you think agents want to read but finding the one agent who gets you and your book.”

-Dana Murphy

Every year, the Writers’ League of Texas brings a faculty of close to thirty agents, editors, and other industry professionals to Austin for its Agents & Editors Conference. As we look ahead to the 25th Annual A&E Conference, taking place June 29–July 1, 2018, we’re happy to share Q&As with some of our faculty here.

An Interview with Dana Murphy

Dana Murphy is a literary agent with The Book Group, focusing on literary fiction and voice-driven nonfiction. After studying critical film theory and sociology at NYU, Dana began her literary career as an assistant at the Book Group in 2012 and started building her own list in 2015. She is interested in adult and YA fiction that feels surprising and immersive and smart narrative nonfiction about pop culture, social issues, and critical theory. She is always looking for a sense of humor, diverse and underrepresented perspectives, and characters that stick in your thoughts long after the story is finished.

Scribe: How would you describe your personal approach to working with an author?

Dana Murphy: Personalized. I purposely keep a pretty small client list and do my best to let each client inform our working relationship. Overall, I’d say I definitely lean on the personal side of professional relationships – I take my job very seriously and, because of the nature of the work, I care very deeply for each of my authors. Beyond just loving the work and the writing, I need to be an advocate for the author, and that usually works better when I like them as a person just as much as I like their words.

Scribe: What do you look for in a debut author?

DM: First and foremost, always voice. That’s not to say there is a one-size-fits-all voice that I’m interested in, but I’m always looking for life behind the words. This is intangible and can sometimes be discouraging for authors to hear. I’m often asked: “How do I create a voice that agents want?” But at the heart of finding your voice is authenticity. It’s not about writing what you think agents want to read but finding the one agent who gets you and your book. I promise, if you’re writing something that your heart isn’t invested in, any agent reading it will see that.

Scribe: If you could give writers one piece of advice, what would it be?

DM: When querying, research agents and follow their submission rules! Every agency has different policies, which can be annoying and sometimes feel arbitrary, but they are essential for me to effectively do my job. There is nothing that turns me off quicker than an author whose behavior belies that they don’t respect our processes, whether that be calling when we explicitly state not to, or mass-emailing non-specific “Dear Agent” queries.  You only have one opportunity to make a first impression, and your behavior during the querying process is usually a good indicator to how you will behave as a client. Entitlement and indigence are not a good look. Do some research about each agent you’re querying, know a little about their list, think about how your book would be a good fit for them, and include that in your query.

Scribe: Has there been a project you took on because there was something special or unique about it, even though it wasn’t like projects you usually take on? 

DM: I feel like that can describe many of my projects! I’m often found saying “Oh, I’m not interested in XYZ” and then turning around and signing something of that ilk the next week. But that is often tied up in what I mentioned earlier: voice. If I find an undeniable voice, I can find myself interested in anything.

Scribe:  Tell us about a recent book that you worked with–you know, brag on one of your writers!

DM:  The first book I sold, Danya Kukafka’s Girl in Snow, was published last summer and has continued to be a thrilling experience. The author is a close friend — we met when I hired her as my intern. Even though the book hasn’t been in the market long, I’ve been working on it with her for nearly 5 years.  It was a project close to both of our hearts, my first sale and her debut novel, and we were consistently (and still!) learning as we go. She’s now an international best seller, we’ve sold the book in over a dozen foreign territories, and the TV rights have been optioned. We couldn’t have anticipated any of this when we first decided to work together and brave the new professional world side by side.  We went into this without expectations, just hoping someone wanted to publish the book, and it’s been so rewarding to go through the good (and bad!) with her.

Thanks, Dana!

Click here to read our 2018 A&E Conference agent bios.

Click here for more information on the 2018 Agents & Editors Conference, a weekend long event in Austin, TX (June 29-July 1) that focuses on the craft of writing, the business of publishing, and building a literary community.

Meet the Conference Faculty: Agent Sarah Phair

“Reading and researching the genre you want to write in is extremely important. “

-Sarah Phair

Every year, the Writers’ League of Texas brings a faculty of close to thirty agents, editors, and other industry professionals to Austin for its Agents & Editors Conference. As we look ahead to the 25th Annual A&E Conference, taking place June 29–July 1, 2018, we’re happy to share Q&As with some of our faculty here.

An Interview with Sarah Phair

Sarah Phair began her career in publishing at Trident Media Group four years ago after completing her M.A. in Literature. She spent two years learning from and assisting two domestic agents before being promoted to Audio Agent, and then to a sales agent in Trident’s Foreign Rights Department. In this position, Sarah contacted international editors to pitch Trident authors and negotiate deals on their behalf. Now, Sarah is building her own client list. She is interested in all women’s fiction, literary fiction, and narrative non-fiction. She is most attracted to stories that are thoughtfully plotted and explore different aspects of lesser known experiences.

Scribe: How would you describe your personal approach to working with an author?

Sarah Phair: I like to be hands on editorially. It is my belief that it’s important to get the manuscript to as close to perfect as possible before sending it out on submission, so it’s possible that I will do a few rounds of edits with an author. I like to brainstorm with my authors and encourage them to bounce ideas off of me. I’ve also been known to assign some reading “homework” to my clients because I think it’s important to read your peers.

Scribe: What do you look for in a debut author?

SP: I am looking for debut writers who are looking to build careers. It’s important for debut authors to stay up to date and read within the genre they want to publish. It’s also helpful if writing and language play a role in their daily life (through their day job, online writing, critique group, etc.).

Scribe: If you could give writers one piece of advice, what would it be?

SP: Reading and researching the genre you want to write in is extremely important. An agent/editor can always spot writers who are attempting to work in a space that they don’t have any personal experience with, and it’s very off-putting.

Scribe: Has there been a project you took on because there was something special or unique about it, even though it wasn’t like projects you usually take on? 

SP: I’m working with a client now who has a novel with a reality TV plotline. This subject isn’t something that normally interests me, but the writer has an amazing sense of humor, and she has an uncanny ability to critique pop culture. It was so fun to read that I just couldn’t pass it up!

Scribe:  Tell us about a recent book that you worked with–you know, brag on one of your writers!

SP: The first book I ever sold on my own is coming out in April. It’s called Don’t Call Me Cupcake by Tara Sheets. I loved this book because she really nails the rom-com genre, which can be so difficult to do. It will be her debut, and I’ve loved going through the whole process with her.

Thanks, Sarah!

Click here to read our 2018 A&E Conference agent bios.

Click here for more information on the 2018 Agents & Editors Conference, a weekend long event in Austin, TX (June 29-July 1) that focuses on the craft of writing, the business of publishing, and building a literary community.

Meet the Conference Faculty: Agent Jennifer Chen Tran

“Part of doing the work means being a good literary citizen, so support your fellow writers and bookstores.”

-Jennifer Chen Tran

Every year, the Writers’ League of Texas brings a faculty of close to thirty agents, editors, and other industry professionals to Austin for its Agents & Editors Conference. As we look ahead to the 25th Annual A&E Conference, taking place June 29–July 1, 2018, we’re happy to share Q&As with some of our faculty here.

An Interview with Jennifer Chen Tran

Jennifer Chen Tran is an agent at Bradford Literary. She represents both fiction and non-fiction. Originally from New York, Jennifer is a lifelong reader and experienced member of the publishing industry. Prior to joining Bradford Literary, she was an Associate Agent at Fuse Literary and served as Counsel at The New Press. She obtained her Juris Doctor from Northeastern School of Law in Boston, MA, and a Bachelors of Arts in English Literature from Washington University in St. Louis. Jennifer understands the importance of negotiation in securing rights on behalf of her authors. She counsels her clients on how to expand their platforms, improve on craft, and works collaboratively with her clients throughout the editorial and publication process. Her ultimate goal is to work in concert with authors to shape books that will have a positive social impact on the world–books that also inform and entertain. She is looking to sign authors from diverse or marginalized backgrounds.

Scribe: How would you describe your personal approach to working with an author?

Jennifer Chen Tran: I’m a very hands-on and editorial agent. I see myself as an author cheerleader and savvy negotiator, and I truly believe in securing the best book deal for my author but also think broadly about how else we can take advantage of subsidiary rights beyond the book. I brainstorm with my clients on creative out-of-the-box approaches to promotion and marketing. I really am a friend and business partner and pride myself on being very responsive to my clients. My role is to add value to all of my interactions with my author-clients, who I feel so gratified to work with.

Scribe: What do you look for in a debut author?

JCT: Many things, but paramount is voice and tension on the page. Characters that feel real, a story that makes me care and think more deeply about the world at large. Professionalism and realistic expectations about the publishing journey, also doesn’t hurt.

Scribe: If you could give writers one piece of advice, what would it be?

JCT: Do the work. Work on your craft, improve your writing. If you write non-fiction, keep placing essays and shorter pieces in journals, magazines, and other literary publications. If you write fiction, keep refining your story, your characters, the setting, and get feedback from others. Part of doing the work means being a good literary citizen, so support your fellow writers and bookstores. (I think that is more than one piece of advice! I like giving advice).

Scribe: Has there been a project you took on because there was something special or unique about it, even though it wasn’t like projects you usually take on? 

JCT: Yes. I represent Cori Salchert, a former perinatal bereavement nurse who now takes care of hospice babies and kiddos with life-limiting medical conditions. She’s been covered in national media outlets, including a recent appearance on Today with Kathie Lee and Hoda. I think it’s the most unique project I’ve worked on because it takes on so many ethical and spiritual questions in a scenario that you don’t often see. Plus, it made me cry more times than I can count.

Scribe:  Tell us about a recent book that you worked with–you know, brag on one of your writers!

JCT: I’m super excited about Spark! a three-book middle grade series that was originally based on a viral Tumblr blog called “Little Girls are Better Superheroes Than You,” where little girls sent in pictures of themselves in homemade costumes and comics artists created superheroic characters based on these pictures. It features Lucia Marquez-Miller, who loves tinkering with her Legos and can take things apart with just the power of her mind. She’s a very positive role model for little girls everywhere but she’s also a normal girl who has homework and wants to please her parents. Lucia fights crime with a motley crew of characters in modern-day San Francisco. It’s a fun story, full of adventure, and I think a lot of middle grade kids will love it. Lion Forge comics is the publisher and the first book in the series will be released next year.

Thanks, Jennifer!

Click here to read our 2018 A&E Conference agent bios.

Click here for more information on the 2018 Agents & Editors Conference, a weekend long event in Austin, TX (June 29-July 1) that focuses on the craft of writing, the business of publishing, and building a literary community.

Meet the Conference Faculty: Agent Eric Myers

“Even if all you want to do is sit and write, these days you have to be prepared to engage with the public at large, and to take charge of your own book promotion.”

-Eric Myers

Every year, the Writers’ League of Texas brings a faculty of close to thirty agents, editors, and other industry professionals to Austin for its Agents & Editors Conference. As we look ahead to the 25th Annual A&E Conference, taking place June 29–July 1, 2018, we’re happy to share Q&As with some of our faculty here.

An Interview with Eric Myers

Eric Myers entered publishing as an author, with three books published by St. Martin’s Press. He has been an agent since 2002, having worked at The Spieler Agency and Dystel, Goderich, and Bourret before establishing Myers Literary Management. His clients include Chris Grabenstein (Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library), Sam Staggs (All About “All About Eve,” Closeup On “Sunset Boulevard”), Seth Rudetsky (My Awesome/Awful Popularity Plan), Miriam Davis (The Axeman of New Orleans), and Patrice Banks (The Girls’ Auto Clinic Glove Box Guide), among many others. He specializes in YA, Middle Grade, Historical Fiction, Thrillers, and most non-fiction, including memoir that comes with a strong platform.

Scribe: How would you describe your personal approach to working with an author?

Eric Myers: As an author myself, I try to be supportive as well as sensitive to an author’s needs.  I am constantly attempting to put myself in my client’s place. But a little tough love is sometimes required as well, and it’s important to know when and when not to use it.

Scribe: What do you look for in a debut author?

EM: I look for a manuscript that is already at least 95 percent perfect; one which shows me that a writer really knows what he or she is doing and is ready for Prime Time.  It helps if the author is social-media savvy, has a feeling for self-promotion, and is willing and able to go out there and do everything possible to get copies of their book sold.

Scribe: If you could give writers one piece of advice, what would it be?

EM: Writing is no longer a solitary profession. Even if all you want to do is sit and write, these days you have to be prepared to engage with the public at large, and to take charge of your own book promotion.

Scribe: Has there been a project you took on because there was something special or unique about it, even though it wasn’t like projects you usually take on? 

EM: One of my most unusual projects is a forthcoming memoir called Girl Electric by Alisa Jones, who was diagnosed with adult-onset epilepsy at 40.  I’ll bet you don’t think an epilepsy memoir can actually be laugh-out-loud funny. Think again! You can find out this November, when it is published by Imagine/Charlesbridge.

Scribe:  Tell us about a recent book that you worked with–you know, brag on one of your writers!

EM: My client Lydia Kang, a physician based in Omaha, has already written several great YA and adult novels.  She joined forces with her journalist friend Nate Pedersen to write Quackery, which was published last year by Workman.  It’s an amazing compendium of all the horrendous quack cures that have been tried out on patients over the centuries. Darkly funny, it is peppered with great visuals, including outrageous old advertisements for every kind of snake-oil scam you can imagine.  It became one of Workman’s biggest hits of the year.

Thanks, Eric!

Click here to read our 2018 A&E Conference agent bios.

Click here for more information on the 2018 Agents & Editors Conference, a weekend long event in Austin, TX (June 29-July 1) that focuses on the craft of writing, the business of publishing, and building a literary community.